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  • Phones read No Service

    I had four phones unplugged yesterday from their normal locations (subnet 10.0.0.xx). The were temporarily plugged in on another subnet at the same site (subnet 10.0.1.xx) when they were moved back to their normal locations, the now all read No Service on the display. Any help would be great!!

  • #2
    Login to Director:
    1- Go to 'USERS'. find and select the user and on the 'General' page at 'Home Port' select 'softswitch' and save.
    2- Go to 'IP Phones'/'Individual IP Phones' and open it and find the MAC address of the phone in the list, 'Check' the box next to the MAC address, scroll to the top of the page and 'Delete the Mac address.
    3 - Re-boot the phone. It should then come up to 'AVAILABLE'
    4 - Go Back to 'Users' / 'Home Port' and re-assign your MAC address to the phone and 'Save'.

    That should fix you up...

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    • #3
      Thanks for the reply. I followed your instructions, and the when I rebooted the phone it tries DHCP, and comes up with an ip address of 192.168.1.138. This is strange, becuase our dhcp server assigns 10.0.0.xx ip addresses...
      Any idea?

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      • #4
        When the phone boots up, at password, enter the set-up and 'Clear' all settings. You may have to remove the MAC address again? Assuming you are working with 'DHCP' on? If not, you may have to manually program the old IP address, subnet, server and so on.

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        • #5
          thanks, I am using DHCP. I will try a clear of the settings.
          I was able to find a workaround, which was to turn dhcp off, and assign a manual ip address, but that is just a band aid. I would like to see the dchp work properly.

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          • #6
            If I was a betting individual, I would say there is another device handing out DHCP somewhere. 192.168.1.0/24 is a common default IP setup for lots of WiFi routers and DSL/cable routers.

            I've had that happen to me a couple of times on installations where someone plugs in a DSL router to use it as a switch under a desk somewhere, and it starts handing out IPs on the wrong network. I would start looking around your office and see if anyone has plugged such a critter in.

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            • #7
              We had this problem recently and found that there was a problem with our DHCP servers not replicating accross our network as to which device had which ip address. Check your main DHCP server for inconsistencies with the DCHP addresses that have been handed out by the local DHCP server and then clean out all of the old/incorrect DCHP information from your servers and that should solve the problem.

              Best,

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Sarsin View Post
                If I was a betting individual, I would say there is another device handing out DHCP somewhere. 192.168.1.0/24 is a common default IP setup for lots of WiFi routers and DSL/cable routers.

                I've had that happen to me a couple of times on installations where someone plugs in a DSL router to use it as a switch under a desk somewhere, and it starts handing out IPs on the wrong network. I would start looking around your office and see if anyone has plugged such a critter in.
                This would be my first thought too. Been bitten by a user adding a "switch" so they could hook up their personal laptop to use at work.... Well the "switch" ended up being a router that was handing out bad IP's.

                It would be worth a look around.

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